Imagine implanting a sensor behind your ear that can check and log your medication doses, or detect a potential allergic reaction to something you’re about to eat.

That’s the vision of a Vancouver, B.C.-based inventor and keynote speaker at today’s Oregon Bio 2015. Wolf Richter, president of Epic Semiconductors, laid out the possibilities for his nanoCloudProcessors.

The sensors powered from conductive surfaces, including polymers, rubber and human skin. Epic’s chip costs one cent, is battery-free, versatile and user friendly, Richter said.

“When you talk about the Internet of Things, this is electronic assistance for wellness, fitness and health care — the BioT,” Richter said.

The patch can measure just about anything, including sensing and action. It can check 5,000 ingredients in two minutes.

Epic’s integrated sub-circuits “feel” the sensitivities of a patient.

“We have touch and gesture recognition built in,” Richter said. “It implants behind the ears, so you have a full stereo assistant. It hears what you hear. It processes the data.”

The chips could also support vital sign monitoring and biochemical analysis. Epic gives a free license to strategic partners.

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September 9, 2015
Elizabeth Hayes
Staff Reporter
Portland Business Journal